The Origin and History of Movie Trailers Explained

Like many of you, I absolutely love watching movie trailers! For film geeks, it's exciting to see what upcoming movies we can to look forward to seeing. They give us our first taste of what a movie will be and are created with the sole purpose of selling us on that film. 

If you've ever wondered how movie trailers got started, we've got a great video from the YouTube channel Today I Found Out that breaks down the origin and history of trailers. One of the things they talk about is how back in the day, trailers weren't shown until the end of the movie, which is why they were called trailers in the first place.

I know that is common knowledge for a lot of people, but it would be so weird watching trailers at the end of movies these days. Anyway, it's an interesting video worth checking out when you get a chance. You can also watch another video that breaks down the history of trailers right here if you want.

KING OF THE HILL Intro Gets Recreated in Pixels

I don't know about you, but I kind of miss the Mike Judge animated series King of the Hill. It was really a great show that was wonderfully entertaining. We don't really ever see a lot of fan-made stuff for the series so when I saw this intro recreated in pixels, I had to share it because it's pretty cool. The video was created by Mauri Helme and I hope you enjoy the flashback of memories it brings. 

See More Joker in New SUICIDE SQUAD: EXTENDED CUT Trailer

Are you one of the people who thought Jared Leto didn't get enough screen time as the Joker in Suicide Squad? (Heck, I didn't even like his performance very much, and I still thought he should have been on screen more.) Birth.Movies.Death points us to a new trailer for the extended cut of the movie, which arrives on Digital HD on November 11th and will hit Blu-ray on December 13, 2016.

I don't think Leto held a candle to what Heath Ledger did in The Dark Knight, but there were those who saw Suicide Squad and thought that giving him more screen time to develop his gangster take on the character might have improved the movie. I suppose we don't have much longer to wait to see if that ends up being true, but either way, we'll be seeing plenty more of Leto's Joker in future installments of the DC Extended Universe.


Suicide Squad: Extended Cut trailer | Batman... by BatmanNewsCom

THE DEFENDERS Confirmed For Eight Episodes, Director Announced

The Defenders, Marvel and Netflix's equivalent of The Avengers in which the street-level heroes Daredevil, Jessica Jones, Luke Cage, and Iron Fist will all join forces to fight evil, has been confirmed to be eight episodes, and in a new announcement straight from Marvel itself, a director has been announced to tackle the first two episodes of the limited series.

Marvel.com says S.J. Clarkson has been tapped to helm the first two episodes. This marks a return to the MCU for Clarkson, who has previously directed episodes of Jessica Jones. She has even more history with Netflix, having directed some of Orange is the New Black as well.

“S.J.'s take on the material is outstanding. We loved her work on “Marvel’s Jessica Jones” and couldn’t think of a more talented and accomplished person to helm the first two episodes of “Marvel’s The Defenders,” said Marvel’s Head of Television and Executive Producer, Jeph Loeb.

The Defenders is set to arrive sometime in 2017, and they'll face off against none other than Sigourney Weaver as the villain. To read everything we know about the limited series, click here

RAMBO is Getting a Feature Film Reboot Without Sylvester Stallone

Say it ain't so! Nu Image and Millennium Films are planning a reboot of the classic action film franchise Rambo. I'm a huge fan of Rambo and I've been waiting to see if Sylvester Stallone would ever make that fifth installment of the franchise, but it looks like that's dead now. 

The worst part of the news is that Stallone will not be a part of the reboot. According to THR, this film will "see a younger actor inhabit the role. The company is looking at Rambo as a character akin to James Bond." Stallone is Rambo and replacing him with a new actor just seems utterly ridiculous. 

The reboot will be called Rambo: New Blood and the production company has hired Brooks McLaren (XOXO) to write the script and Ariel Vromen (Criminal) to direct the movie.

There are no plot details to share right now but I imagine they plan to contemporize the story and character. I'm not too thrilled to hear that a classic franchise like Rambo is getting the reboot treatment, but I guess that's the kind of thing we should expect from Hollywood these days. Heaven forbid they try to come up with an original new action hero. 

EDGE OF TOMORROW 2 is Both a Sequel and a Prequel, and Will “Revolutionize How People Make Sequels”

Doug Liman isn't interested in making boring, middle of the road Hollywood entertainment. He's a director who wants to push the boundaries of what's possible and how things get made, whether its turning the comic book movie genre on its head with the upcoming Justice League Dark, or crafting an awesome sequel to Edge of Tomorrow, the 2014 Tom Cruise/Emily Blunt time travel thriller that turned out to be one of the best action films of the past decade.

Liman spoke with Collider about Edge of Tomorrow 2, and revealed something cool about its structure:

“That is the only sequel that I’m considering doing, and it’s because first of all the story is so amazing—much better than the original film, and I loved and loved the original film—and second of all, it’s a sequel that’s a prequel.”
“I’ve had some radical ideas about how to make a sequel that would interest me, in the same way that I had ideas of how you make an independent film and then Swingers came along and it was like ‘Aha, that’s the perfect movie for me to test these ideas out on.’ I had these intellectual ideas on how you should make a sequel that are unlike how anybody else makes a sequel, and this script and this idea fit perfectly into that idea. So it’s gonna revolutionize how people make sequels."

Man, that sounds excellent. I love the idea of trying to push beyond what's expected from a sequel, and especially considering how beloved Edge of Tomorrow is by not only the fans but all of the creative talent who made it, you know they aren't just going to crap something out just to capitalize and make money on the name. They're really looking to come back and do something cool with a sequel/prequel combo, and I love the idea of exploring this world further than what we've already seen in the original.

What did you think about Edge of Tomorrow? Are you looking forward to a sequel?

H/T: ComingSoon

IR Exclusive: Christopher Nolan’s ‘Dunkirk’ 35mm & 70mm to Open Two Days Early

Christopher Nolan Directing

by: Jay Carlson – Editor-in-Chief
with: Joshua Outred – Staff Writer

Christopher Nolan’s love of film in its physical celluloid form has been well documented. He’s been at the forefront of a movement, along with other high-profile directors like Paul Thomas Anderson, Steven Spielberg, J.J. Abrams, Wes Anderson, Rian Johnson and Judd Apatow to keep film stock alive as a viable option for filmmakers in an industry that’s become more and more reliant on digital production, from the way that it’s shot to the way that it’s projected in our favorite temples of cinema. Quentin Tarantino, one of the most vocal of the directors who have sworn their allegiance to physical film even went so far as to retrofit his New Beverly Cinema to 35mm film projection only. Most recently the outspoken director released a special Roadshow cut of his latest film, The Hateful Eight, early to theaters equipped to project the film in 70mm, his preferred exhibition of the film.

Back in August Warner Bros announced that Christopher Nolan’s upcoming WWII epic Dunkirk would be released on July 21st  2017, but a source with knowledge of the release has revealed to me that Nolan and Warner Bros are planning to reward theaters who have the ability to project film (and fans who enjoy seeing it that way) by releasing the film two days early on July 19th.

You’ll recall that Nolan employed this same rollout (along with Paramount) for Interstellar, releasing the film two days early back in November of 2014, dropping the film in 240 theaters in 77 markets equipped to handle 70MM IMA X® film, 70mm film and 35mm film formats. The director’s insistence was not without controversy, as many exhibitors  have abandoned their film projectors in favor of embracing digital projection and spending millions in the process to do so. “This devalues what we’ve done. I can’t afford to get the projectors out of the warehouse for two days, and I don’t even have anyone to operate them,” said Joe Paletta, CEO and founder of Spotlight Theatres, a Georgia chain that had switched to all-digital projection. Foothills Cinemas president and CEO Byron Berkley also went on record stating, “It makes no sense to step back in time.”

In a speech given at CinemaCon in 2014 Nolan explained his allegiance to shooting and presenting his films on film vs digitally comes from a simple (yet VERY debatable) case of digital currently being unable to surpass the quality of physical film stock, stating,”I am not committed to film out of nostalgia. I am in favor of any kind of technical innovation but it needs to exceed what has gone before and so far nothing has exceeded anything that’s come before.”

The debate is far from one sided though, as digital certainly has its share of heavy hitter’s on the other side of the fence, with director’s such as David Fincher, Matt Reeves, Danny Boyle, Steven Soderbergh and Robert Rodriguez all embracing digital productions. James Cameron might be digital’s biggest cheerleader, a director who has always pushed filmmaking technology forward, even developing the technology personally when necessary.

I have no dog in the digital vs film fight. From a production standpoint, digital production has opened up a whole new world of filmmaking for filmmakers who might otherwise not have the opportunity to make movies. More voices having access and making films is a great thing. It should be the artist’s decision to pick which medium they feel most comfortable realizing their preferred vision. It’s imperative that there are devotees on the production side, as well as the exhibition side that are keeping the format alive for artists that want to explore that option. I also love that the studio is backing Nolan and allowing his fans the opportunity to see the film in the manner that he originally intended before the full digital rollout.

Dunkirk is Nolan’s take on the historic and heroic events of 1940. When the German forces pinned the militaries of the British, French and Belgium into a trap, coming from the North, East and South, there seemed to be no hope for the allies. What followed was an evacuation from Dunkirk which seemed impossible and hopeless, with France now occupied by Hitler and endless divisions , and the French forces heavily depleted, the nightmare that the entire Allied force could potentially be captured or destroyed was becoming reality.

Eventually, after eight long days, and a mistake by Hitler which gave the Allied troops time to escape, essentially costing him the war, the remaining Allied forces managed to make it safely across the channel and back to British soil. A combination of British war vessels, merchant ships, fishing boats and luxury yachts carried these brave soldiers to safety, and saving the lives of 345,895 thousand troops.


IR Exclusive: Christopher Nolan’s ‘Dunkirk’ 35mm & 70mm to Open Two Days Early

Christopher Nolan Directing

by: Jay Carlson – Editor-in-Chief
with: Joshua Outred – Staff Writer

Christopher Nolan’s love of film in its physical celluloid form has been well documented. He’s been at the forefront of a movement, along with other high-profile directors like Paul Thomas Anderson, Steven Spielberg, J.J. Abrams, Wes Anderson, Rian Johnson and Judd Apatow to keep film stock alive as a viable option for filmmakers in an industry that’s become more and more reliant on digital production, from the way that it’s shot to the way that it’s projected in our favorite temples of cinema. Quentin Tarantino, one of the most vocal of the directors who have sworn their allegiance to physical film even went so far as to retrofit his New Beverly Cinema to 35mm film projection only. Most recently the outspoken director released a special Roadshow cut of his latest film, The Hateful Eight, early to theaters equipped to project the film in 70mm, his preferred exhibition of the film.

Back in August Warner Bros announced that Christopher Nolan’s upcoming WWII epic Dunkirk would be released on July 21st  2017, but a source with knowledge of the release has revealed to me that Nolan and Warner Bros are planning to reward theaters who have the ability to project film (and fans who enjoy seeing it that way) by releasing the film two days early on July 19th.

You’ll recall that Nolan employed this same rollout (along with Paramount) for Interstellar, releasing the film two days early back in November of 2014, dropping the film in 240 theaters in 77 markets equipped to handle 70MM IMA X® film, 70mm film and 35mm film formats. The director’s insistence was not without controversy, as many exhibitors  have abandoned their film projectors in favor of embracing digital projection and spending millions in the process to do so. “This devalues what we’ve done. I can’t afford to get the projectors out of the warehouse for two days, and I don’t even have anyone to operate them,” said Joe Paletta, CEO and founder of Spotlight Theatres, a Georgia chain that had switched to all-digital projection. Foothills Cinemas president and CEO Byron Berkley also went on record stating, “It makes no sense to step back in time.”

In a speech given at CinemaCon in 2014 Nolan explained his allegiance to shooting and presenting his films on film vs digitally comes from a simple (yet VERY debatable) case of digital currently being unable to surpass the quality of physical film stock, stating,”I am not committed to film out of nostalgia. I am in favor of any kind of technical innovation but it needs to exceed what has gone before and so far nothing has exceeded anything that’s come before.”

The debate is far from one sided though, as digital certainly has its share of heavy hitter’s on the other side of the fence, with director’s such as David Fincher, Matt Reeves, Danny Boyle, Steven Soderbergh and Robert Rodriguez all embracing digital productions. James Cameron might be digital’s biggest cheerleader, a director who has always pushed filmmaking technology forward, even developing the technology personally when necessary.

I have no dog in the digital vs film fight. From a production standpoint, digital production has opened up a whole new world of filmmaking for filmmakers who might otherwise not have the opportunity to make movies. More voices having access and making films is a great thing. It should be the artist’s decision to pick which medium they feel most comfortable realizing their preferred vision. It’s imperative that there are devotees on the production side, as well as the exhibition side that are keeping the format alive for artists that want to explore that option. I also love that the studio is backing Nolan and allowing his fans the opportunity to see the film in the manner that he originally intended before the full digital rollout.

Dunkirk is Nolan’s take on the historic and heroic events of 1940. When the German forces pinned the militaries of the British, French and Belgium into a trap, coming from the North, East and South, there seemed to be no hope for the allies. What followed was an evacuation from Dunkirk which seemed impossible and hopeless, with France now occupied by Hitler and endless divisions , and the French forces heavily depleted, the nightmare that the entire Allied force could potentially be captured or destroyed was becoming reality.

Eventually, after eight long days, and a mistake by Hitler which gave the Allied troops time to escape, essentially costing him the war, the remaining Allied forces managed to make it safely across the channel and back to British soil. A combination of British war vessels, merchant ships, fishing boats and luxury yachts carried these brave soldiers to safety, and saving the lives of 345,895 thousand troops.